Monday, October 20, 2014

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Catholic Education Daily

 

Religious Orders Remain Committed to Catholic Education

Catholic schools have struggled with the decline of religious men and women in the classroom since Vatican II, but growing religious orders are “teaching the Truth in Christ” to Catholic school students across the country— a vibrant sign of hope for the future of Catholic education, according to an article in the National Catholic Register.

The Register reports on the Nashville Dominicans, the School Sisters of Christ the King, the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist and the Norbertine Fathers, all of whom are “motivated to remain in Catholic education” and keep Catholic identity as the focus of their teaching apostolate.

The Nashville Dominicans, who teach at the Newman Guide-recommended Aquinas College in Nashville, Tenn., also teach in about 40 schools throughout the country. Dominican Sister Anne Catherine Burleigh, principal of St. Cecilia Academy in Nashville, Tenn., reportedly told the Register that graduates receive an excellent, all-around education, but most importantly, “we equip them to go out and transform the culture for Christ.”

The Sisters of Christ the King serve in the Diocese of Lincoln, Neb., and they hope to not only form their students in the Catholic faith, but also want students to bring home their faith and positively impact their families, according to the Register.  The sisters help run St. James School in Crete, Neb., which serves 100 students in grades K-6, about half of whom are Hispanics learning the English language.

The Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist, headquartered in Ann Arbor, Mich., have grown to 120 sisters in 18 years of existence, with an average age of 29.  They teach in eight states but have hundreds of requests to teach in other places, according to the Register.

Finally, the Norbertine Fathers operate St. Michael’s Abbey Preparatory School, an all-boys boarding school in Silverado, Calif, with the mission “to make boys Catholic gentlemen… faith, academics and character: not only teaching the boys, but forming them in an environment that is 100% Catholic.”  The students attend morning Mass and 40 minutes of Eucharistic adoration in the evening, according to the Register.

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